Wednesday, February 02, 2005

INDIA: Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) 01FEB [4 NEWS CLIPPINGS}

HEADLINES IN CLIPPINGS

01. India's new security management takes charge
02. RAW counter-intelligence wing is to blame for spy's escape: NSA report
03. New Army, IB, RAW chiefs take over
04. Overhaul Day for Indian security set up
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01/02/2005

01. India's new security management takes charge
By Iftikhar Gilani

NEW DELHI: India's new security management took over on Monday and it
was perhaps for the first time that three important wings – the army,
Intelligence Bureau (IB) and Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) – had
new chiefs simultaneously and all of them assumed office on the same
day.

Gen Joginder Jaswant Singh became the first Sikh to assume the chief
of the army staff (COAS) office. A highly-decorated Maratha Light
officer, Gen JJ Singh is the 22nd Indian Army Chief. He accepted the
chief's baton from outgoing chief Gen NC Vij at a ceremony. Earlier,
he had held senior staff appointments such as serving as the
additional director general in the military operations during the
Kargil conflict, commander-in-chief of army training command and
commander-in-chief of the western army command. As a brigade
commander, he had been seriously injured in Jammu and Kashmir during
an ambush by militants.

Besides NC Vij, IB Chief Ajit K Doval and RAW chief CD Sahay also
stepped down on Monday and passed batons to ES Lakshmi Narasimhan and
PK Hormis Tharakan respectively.

The government had recently appointed MK Narayanan the new national
security advisor (NSA) after JN Dixit's death. With these
appointments, it was expected that the Indian intelligence apparatus
was set for a major overhaul.

Experts believe that RAW, which has been under scrutiny for quite some
time due to the defection of one of its officers to the US, will be
overhauled urgently.

The new RAW chief, Tharakan, was the chief of police in Kerala state
and had earlier served with RAW for about a decade. From the 1968
batch of the Indian Police Service (IPS), he has headed intelligence
desks in Europe and Nepal. He would be retiring in June this year.

LINK
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_1-2-2005_pg7_48


01/02/2005

02. RAW counter-intelligence wing is to blame for spy's escape: NSA report

The chief of Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) and the head of its
counter-intelligence wing chief both retired today under the shadow of
a report from National Security Advisor M K Narayanan, which virtually
indicts their organisation.

Narayanan's report on the defection of Rabinder Singh, the spy who
turned his back on India's external security agency, to flee to the
US, has been submitted to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. It is a
classified document, which has not been shared with RAW's outgoing
chief C D Sahay and his batchmate Amar Bhushan, who headed the
Aviation Research Centre as well as counter-intelligence for the
agency.

The Indian Express has learnt that Narayanan has squarely blamed the
counter-intelligence wing, which failed to nab Singh despite tailing
him.

Adding an ironic twist to the episode is the fact that Singh, now
known to have been working for the US, was making his escape around
the same time that C D Sahay was visiting that country. Till then, RAW
was still trying to piece together the extent of Singh's betrayal.

Narayanan, a former Intelligence Bureau (IB) chief, has pointed out
how RAW's counter-intelligence wing let Singh give it the slip despite
having him in its sights. Nor did it bother to alert other agencies
like IB to keep tabs on him.

In fact, RAW officials were in Amritsar on April 30, hoping to catch
Singh while he "made a drop". He did not go to Amritsar and showed up
in Nepalgunj four days later. It was only then that RAW learnt of his
escape to Nepal. It was too late by then as Singh was given a US
passport by Nepal-based US operatives and flown to the US via Vienna.

Interestingly, Sahay visited three European stations and the US
towards the end of April and beginning of May. Singh surfaced in
Nepalgunj on May 4.

Only a select few in the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) have seen
Narayanan's report. Sources said it was prepared after the NSA went
down for at least three sessions at the agency's headquarters in CGO
complex. The RAW also provided transcripts of the videotapes that
showed Rabinder Singh photocopying secret documents in his office.

The NDA government was given a report on the defection by Sahay only
on May 11, 2004.

This newspaper has also learnt that it was largely on the basis of the
NSA's damaging report, submitted earlier this month, that the Prime
Minister decided that the next RAW chief should be from outside the
organisation. Thus, the claims of RAW Special Secretary J K Sinha were
ignored and the P K Hormese Tharakan, an outsider, was appointed
Sahay's successor.

Meanwhile, Narayanan is still finalising the report on restructuring
RAW, including the issue of expanding its cadre strength which has
been looked at by the agency's former chief A S Dulat. It is
understood that the NSA is in favour of beefing up the
counter-intelligence wing of RAW.

LINK
http://www.indianexpress.com/full_story.php?content_id=63812


01/02/2005

03. New Army, IB, RAW chiefs take over

A new security management in the country took over on Monday. Perhaps
for the first time three important wings, the Army, the Intelligence
Bureau (IB) and the external intelligence Research and Analysis Wing
(RAW) had new chiefs simultaneously, and all of them assumed office on
the same day.

Gen Joginder Jaswant Singh became the first Sikh to assume the office
of new Chief of the Army Staff (COAS). A highly-decorated Maratha
Light Infantry officer, Gen J J Singh is the 22nd Indian Army Chief.
He accepted the Chief's baton at a ceremony from the outgoing Chief
Gen N C Vij here. Earlier, he had held senior staff appointments like
serving as Additional Director General in the Military Operations
during the Kargil conflict, Commander-in-Chief of Army Training
Command and Commander-in-Chief of the Western Army Command.

As a Brigade Commander, he had been seriously injured in Kashmir
during an ambush by militants. Besides, Vij, the IB Chief Ajit K.
Doval and RAW chief CD Sahay also stepped down here on Monday and
passed batons to E S Lakshmi Narasimhan and P.K.Hormis Tharakan
respectively. Recently, the government had appointed M K Narayanan as
new National Security Advisor (NSA) after the demise of J. N. Dixit.

With these appointments, it is expected that Indian intelligence
apparatus is set for a major overhaul. Experts here believe the RAW,
which is the line of fire for quite some time due to defection of one
its officers to US, will be overhauled urgently.

The new chief PK Hormis Tharakan, was chief of police force in
southern Keralra state and had earlier served with the RAW for about a
decade. A 1968 batch Indian Police Service (IPS) officer, he has
headed intelligence desks in Europe and Nepal. He would be retiring in
June this year.

The most important security wing directly associated with Kashmir, the
Intelligence Bureau's new chief ESL Narasimhan is a low key officer
from technical intelligence. The outgoing chief Ajit Doval, who is
considered an expert on Kashmir and Pakistan only after A. S. Dulat in
the intelligence circles, had tried his best to get a second term.
But, his close proximity with former deputy prime minister L. K.
Advani weighed against him.

Due to his expertise on Pakistan, his name was suggested by the Prime
Ministers Office (PMO) for heading the National Security Council
Secretariat as deputy national security advisor. But, there was a
chorus of opposition from the Foreign Service officials. For the time
being, the government has asked diplomat Satish Chandra to continue as
secretary of National Security Council Secretriat and deputy NSA.

He had retired during the previous NDA rule, but continued to man the
NSA apparatus.

LINK
http://www.indiadaily.com/breaking_news/23133.asp

01/02/2005

04. Overhaul Day for Indian security set up

Army's first Sikh chief is taking charge of a force of over a million.

The Intelligence Bureau is being passed over from India's finest hand
on terrorism to a man known for his expertise in technical
intelligence.

Meanwhile at Research and Analysis Wing, an IPS officer known for his
sleuthing skills is taking over for an expected clean up.

By sheer coincidence of retirement dates, Army Chief Nirmal Chand Vij,
Intelligence Bureau chief Ajit K Doval, and RAW chief CD Sahay are
stepping down today.

But for reasons other than mere coincidence, all three institutions
are set to see more than new chiefs.

Of all the three agencies, it is at RAW the maximum action is
expected, though most of it may never be known in public.

Reeling under the defection of double-agent Rabinder Singh, RAW is
urgently in need of an overhaul of ethics and work culture, many
observers feel.

As if agreeing with that demand, the government has brought in PK
Hormis Tharakan, a decorated IPS officer who is highly popular among
his contemporaries.

The Kerala Director General of Police, who has earned praise from the
Kerala High Court recently for the handling of a major communal flare
up, may have more than just warring factions to handle.

The moneyed foreign intelligence agency has numerous troubles at
various levels to be handled, including foreign postings and misuse of
those offices and pulling up of morale of middle and lower rungs.

Tharakan has been given a complete free hand by the Prime Minister in
his efforts, it seems. At the Intelligence Bureau, Ajit Doval, whose
expertise on Kashmir, Pakistan and terrorism are legendary, is handing
over charge to ESL Narasimhan, a low key officer known for his
expertise in technical intelligence and discipline.

While Narasimhan is not expected to bring in any sweeping changes, the
speculation as of now is about how government is going to retain
Doval's services.

When his name was suggested by the PMO for heading the National
Security Council Secretariat as deputy national security advisor,
there was a chorus of opposition from the Indian Foreign Service.

Army's image has taken a beating in recent times. Fake encounters by
Army officers have raised serious questions over how Army judges its
officers.

Human rights violations in Kashmir and northeast have also plagued the
force. Both indicate something seriously wrong with the way Army
judges its middle rung officers' performance.

General Singh will have to tighten the grip to see that the erosion in
discipline is checked.

http://www.keralanext.com/news/readnext,1.asp?id=102556&pg=2