Wednesday, October 06, 2004

Analysis: North East Carnage - Delhi planning unified actions

[On Saturday, the first days of the carnage, banned Assamese outfit National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) militants gunned down 15 Muslim villagers At Makrijhora in Assam, reported the Asian Age.The NSCN-IM said that it was not responsible for the violence, marked by blasts and firings, in Dimapur and announced it would conduct its own probe to hunt down the offenders.]

Trouble in Assam, Nagaland: Delhi plans unified action against rebels


In the face of a rise in violence in India's troubled north-east claiming at least 64 lives in Nagaland and Assam and injuring scores over the past three days, India is planning to respond with a 'unified' and 'coordinated' approach to deal with the militant outfits there, said Indian Home Minister Shivraj Patil, visiting the area.

Patil told reporters in Guwahati that India's central government had accepted a proposal of the Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi for a united operation of all security forces in the insurgency hit states of the north-east India.

He said, 'we have to find a long-term solution to end insurgency in the region.'

Later, in Dimapur, commercial hub of Nagaland and scene of the carnage, after talks with its Chief Minister Riu Nphieu, Patil said a long term strategy for combating insurgency in the north-east India would be formulated soon with emphasis on 'proper coordination' among the state's law enforcement agencies and the people in general.

According to media reports, the Indian intelligence agencies suspect that the blasts were an attempt to 'derail' the seven-year old peace process between the Indian central government and the National Social Council of Nagaland-Isak Muvia group (NSCN-IM) and could have been carried out by rival NSCN-Kaplang group, or the ULFA, which recently rejected the Assam government's offer of unconditional talks.

On Saturday, the first days of the carnage, banned Assamese outfit National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) militants gunned down 15 Muslim villagers At Makrijhora in Assam, reported the Asian Age.

The NSCN-IM said that it was not responsible for the violence, marked by blasts and firings, in Dimapur and announced it would conduct its own probe to hunt down the offenders.

Blaming 'anti-Naga elements' for the mindless violence, NSCN- IM leader K Chawang said in a statement, published by the Hindu, 'we shall leave no stone unturned to unearth the truth and punish the criminals befittingly.'

Assam Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi spent no time to state that the militants were operating from Bangladesh and Myanmar.

But the Indian Home Minister Patil refused to make any comment on the allegation.

Patil said described the violence as a 'dastardly and cowardly acts' and the Indian government would do everything to help the Assam government.

The leader of the opposition and former deputy Prime Minister L K Advani accused the Congress-led UP government of being 'callous and casual' in dealing with internal security of India.

Advani said, 'the guilt of the UPA government is not only on account of negligence. It is of a far higher order.'

He said, 'the Congress carries the stigma of having aided and abated terrorists and extremist outfits that are now having a field day in different parts of India.'

'This is most clearly evident in Assam, where the Congress party openly accepted the support of ULFA, a banned secessionist organisation,' said Advani.

He said, after a meeting of senior BJP leaders with former Prime Minister Atal Behari Bajpayee to discuss India?s internal security scenario, 'the Congress gave protection to ULFA and ULFA in turn gave patronage to Congress candidates in parliamentary polls in Assam no wonder the extremist organisation has now felt emboldened to carry out its murderous activities with impunity.'

Advani said, 'yet another example was the short-sighted manner in which the Congress government in Andhra Pradesh had dealt with the PWG (People's War Group), a Naxalite outfit.'

Criticising Home Minister Patil, for favouring a long term strategy to combat the militants in India's north-east, Advani said, 'militants are bent on violence with a short term objective, it needs to countered immediately and firmly.'

BSS, New Delhi 05/10/2004